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This dog has learned to buy treats with leaves and has been doing it for years

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The term money is kind of crazy when you think about it.

We are one of the few known species that have staged complex social structures based solely on the acquisition of imaginary numbers of "wealth" – and that has long been a human concept. It started with territories, then resources, then these resources were represented in currency, and over the years this currency changed into many shapes and forms of bricks to metals to a particular metal that is not really useful for anything except exceptionally shiny to be paper, and now, digital numbers.

It is bananas that our overall value as a member of our species is generally measured by a completely fabricated system of monetary rules (which are often broken) in order to measure individual success. It is really crazy.

So the animals looking for food and looking for it must seem a bit strange for people to exchange pieces of paper for the things they want.

But that does not mean that they are unwilling to participate in this system if they say they are being fed. Just ask Negro, the black dog living on the Diversified Technical Education Monterrey Casanare Institute in Colombia.

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Negro is the school's unofficial mascot. He has a sweet demeanor and is loved by the students, faculty and staff of the school. They give him food, shelter and water and in return he takes care of the place.

During his "safety rounds" on campus, Negro noted that the schoolchildren were buying snacks from a stand between their classes. Seeing that the students exchanged something that looked like leaves, he decided to go for biscuits himself.




The teacher Angela Garcia Bernal spoke with The Dodo about Negro's unique approach to securing some treat.

"He would go to the store and the kids will give money and get something in return, and one day, spontaneously, he would appear with a leaf in his mouth, wagging his tail and let it know that he wanted a biscuit. "

Gladys Barreto, who has been working at the school's biscuit booth for years, says Negroes have been around for foliage treats for quite some time paid.

"He comes every day for biscuits, he always pays with a hand, it's his daily purchase . " [1 9459013]

Now, even though the Negro is adorable, the workers in the school will be sure that the boy does not have too much of it. They feed him only treats that are digestive, and they limit the amount of "purchases" he can make in one day so he does not get too round.

Although Bernal and everyone on campus are now accustomed to Negro's behavior, they still recognize how special a dog is.

"When you see it for the first time, you are almost I want to cry, it has found a way to make itself understood, it is very intelligent."

Also on the official Facebook page of the school he has become somewhat famous

Negro is not the first dog

The Pankun and James series in Japan was full of examples where a curious Chimp (Pankun) and his brave bulldog mate (James) participated in all sorts of "human" challenges , Like the time when they got on a train all by themselves, having received an exercise from their teacher and mentor the day before

Then there was a black lab that was being trained, to use real money of

There are some cases of animals hug the less tasty aspects of the trade.

Then there was this lovable Shiba-Inu, the sweetest cigarette-holder in the world all over Japan.

Not much of a seller, but who cares if you have one caress good boys with an affinity for cucumbers?



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