Home OMG! Common misconceptions about popular foods debunked

Common misconceptions about popular foods debunked

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You do not have to consider yourself a foodie to be an expert on specific foods. However, there are some commonly accepted ideas about many popular foods that deserve some fact checking. When it comes to fast food, snacks and popular dishes, you may have believed some things that were really too good to be true.

Golden Snack Immortal

If you are considering preparing for an apocalypse, consider overcrowding the boxes with Twinkies. Unfortunately, the popular snack only has a shelf life of 45 days. Despite depictions in films like sausage Partyor widespread rumors about the internet, twinkies will eventually be bad and will not last forever.

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Hamburger forever

If you're a fan of McDonalds hamburgers, you may have heard rumors that the whole beef patty does not rot. The rumors are true, but not for the reasons you might think. McDonald's burgers have a very low water content, so they do not break down as easily as other burgers.

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The dark side of the chicken

The breasts and wings of a chicken may be more desirable because it is white meat. However, this does not mean that it is better for your health. Dark meat may contain more fat, but it contains more zinc, iron, vitamin B6 and other health benefits for your body. Studies have also shown an association between dark meat and a lower risk of heart disease.

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For eyes and land

Eating your vegetables may be good for you, but the idea that carrots are good for your eyesight has something to do with World War II. Britain wanted to keep its radar technology under wraps, and food rationing made the lives of citizens a challenge. Although the carrots are really good for the eye and rich in nutrients, the information that is spread over the vegetables makes them more enjoyable.

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A sweet immigrant story

Maybe because of the legend of Johnny AppleseedApple pie is considered a pure American dessert. Apple pie, however, is not native to American cuisine. In England and the Netherlands savory and sweet cakes were popular before the Americans came up with the idea. When apples arrived in America in the 17th century, the rich and sweet fruits made the perfect filling delicious Pies.

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